towary mieszane
on exhibiting, display, environment, texture, structure and some other matters of art
towary mieszane
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robertrauschenberg:

Per Olof Ultvedt, Pelican - collage.
Ultvedt’s collage, which sold yesterday at Stockholms Auktionsverk, includes sketches and photographs of the 1963 premiere performance of Pelican by Robert Rauschenberg. In the performance, Rauschenberg and Ultvedt (replaced by Alex Hay in later performances) roller skated with open parachutes attached their backs as Carolyn Brown danced on pointe between them.
Watch an excerpt of Pelican on YouTube.
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letargos:

Gregor Schneider
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weissesrauschen:

Tom Molloy: NATIVE
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shihlun:

Chris Marker, Level Five, 1997.
shihlun:

Chris Marker, Level Five, 1997.
shihlun:

Chris Marker, Level Five, 1997.
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"All novelists should live in two different worlds: a real one and an unreal one."
John Fowles (via theparisreview)
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c-inefilia:

One of the first questions one could pose [ regarding love] is the question of the difference betwen the who and the what. Is love the love of someone, or the love of some thing? Supposing  I loved someone : Do I love someone for the absolute singularity of who they are? : ” I love you because you are you.”, or do I love your qualities, your beauty, your intelligence? Does one love someone, or does one love something about someone? Does my heart move because I love someone who is an absolute  singularity, or because I love the way that someone is?(….) I think that whoever starts to love, is in love, or stops loving, is caught between this division between the who and the what.  ( Jacques Derrida)
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biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
biblipeacay:

vertigo1871:

Johann Friedrich Karl, Ansichten von Schloss und Park Freudenhein, 1794

These images are almost certainly sourced from the State Library of Passau in Germany, which has a very large list of regional views of Lower Saxony.
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sonofsolace:

 ”The Rothko Chapel became the world’s first broadly ecumenical center, a holy place open to all religions and belonging to none. It became a center for international cultural, religious, and philosophical exchanges, for colloquia and performances. And it became a place of private prayer for individuals of all faiths”Susan J. Barnes
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nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
nostlaco:

"The idea behind the glove was a practical one on Wes Craven’s part, as he wanted to give the character a unique weapon, but also something that could be made cheaply and wouldn’t be difficult to use or transport. At the time, he was studying primal fears embedded in the subconscious of people of all cultures and discovered that one of those fears is attack by animal claws. Around the same time, he saw his cat unsheathe its claws, and the two concepts merged."

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
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Hans Bellmer, Etude d’après La mitrailleuse en état de grâce (A study of a machine gun in a state of grace), 1962
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Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois

Louise Bourgeois
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theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”
Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.
theparisreview:

“It’s the story of what it means to live in a cultural climate that stifles almost every creative impulse, and why it so often seems we should stop trying.”
Dan Piepenbring on Cory Arcangel’s new book, Working on My Novel, a compilation of tweets from people who are putatively at work on novels.
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wandrlust:

Alexandra Road Estate (Rowley Way), London, England, 1979 — Neave Brown